Design for America: Food Waste

Chinese despair at endless food-safety crises:

"I watched China on the Tip of the Tongue, and I enjoyed it with my family,” says retiree Zhang Binyi, 65. “but none of us believes that food is so nice nowadays. I think non-toxic foods remain only in our memories.”
"How come I didn’t see any ‘gutter’ cooking oil, poisonous milk powder, dyed bread rolls and old leather shoes?" TV anchorman Wang Mudi asked recently on a Chinese version of Twitter, referring to four China’s countless food-safety scandals.

USA Today (Tuesday, May 29, 2012)

Chinese despair at endless food-safety crises:

"I watched China on the Tip of the Tongue, and I enjoyed it with my family,” says retiree Zhang Binyi, 65. “but none of us believes that food is so nice nowadays. I think non-toxic foods remain only in our memories.”

"How come I didn’t see any ‘gutter’ cooking oil, poisonous milk powder, dyed bread rolls and old leather shoes?" TV anchorman Wang Mudi asked recently on a Chinese version of Twitter, referring to four China’s countless food-safety scandals.

USA Today (Tuesday, May 29, 2012)


9 Things You’ve Never Heard About America’s Food

Tracie McMillan, author of The American Way of Eating, was a guest speaker at Northwestern University on May 21. In a recent Huffington Post entry, she comments on the class warfare of food:

"It drove me mad when I started to hear foodies wax rhapsodic over local produce, going on to imply, not-so-subtly, that to buy it was a measure of character and moral standing. I grew up eating processed food during the week, fresh stuff on weekends—that’s how it works when you’re being raised by a working, single dad—but that didn’t mean my family didn’t care about food; it was just what was easiest. And the families I now reported on? They cared about their meals and health, but they were mostly eating what was easy—readily available, affordable, tasty. My family and the ones I reported on weren’t immoral. We were just broke and stressed."

More after the jump.


I would rather have one barleycorn than all the jewels in the world.

Via Jenna Spevack’s exhibit, “8 Extraordinary Greens.” good:

Spevack or one of the gallery’s employees will invite visitors to donate whatever they think the value of one ounce of greens might be to one of five food-related causes. In exchange, the gallery-goers receive a portion of the greens. They can take them away or they can choose to give them to a food pantry. All of these decisions are recorded on a receipt, signed by the gallery-goer and Spevack, and sealed with wax.

On the back of the receipt is a quote from the Barnyard Cockerel, a character from “The Cock and the Jewel,” one of Aesop’s fables…

…“It’s about food versus objects that don’t have an intrinsic value, and weighing that,“ said Spevack. “The original version was interpreted as: Oh, this rooster is a moron, who couldn’t even tell that this was a valuable thing.” But more recently, she said, it’s been interpreted as a story in which the jewel’s value was determined in the context of one culture. Food, on the other hand, should have a value to everyone. 


the blog looks awesome guys! Keep up the great documentation :) from dfanu

Thanks - will do. We couldn’t do it without our terrific studio leads.